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  1. #1251


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    kissthisguy is a website of misheard lyrics.

    The son of a friend of mine used to perversely sing "And another one rides the bus"

    While I like Olivia Newton-John singing "You're the Wizard of Oz, Ohoh , Oh, Oh, Oh."
    John
    "There are two types of problems: those that solve themselves, and those which you can do nothing about"
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  2. #1252


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    I've reached the age where I can't remember if I've told this before, but:

    Years ago, my old dad was dozing by the fire when the radio started playing Frank Sinatra droning through the greatest hit of his later years. Dad stirred and murmured "Wassat? What's he on about? I Did It Sideways? Silly arse." and drifted back into the Land of Nod.
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  3. #1253


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    One I can't find being mentioned before on here, but I have just heard LisaMarie Presley on TV use this word:

    American English: normalcy
    UK English: normality

  4. #1254


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    Yesterday this article appeared on the BBC's website
    British English is invading America English.

  5. #1255


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    I'm not a typical example of a "user" of Britishisms here in the States, since I worked in England for a year and picked up and still use just about all those phrases, etc.. It adds color (sorry, colour) to American English conversations and I've been reminded on more than a few occasions that I'm just "showing off!"

  6. #1256


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    One we don't hear in the US is using a "t" in place of "ed" for the past tense of certain verbs:


    e.g.

    UK - unspoilt (as an unspoilt Cotswold village)
    US - unspoiled

  7. #1257


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    That's something new I've learnt .
    John
    "There are two types of problems: those that solve themselves, and those which you can do nothing about"
    Isabel Allende's grandmother

  8. #1258


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    Some more like that:

    burnt/burned
    dwelt/dwelled
    knelt/kneeled
    Spelt/spelled
    knit/knitted

  9. #1259


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    Now that I see a few examples, I think I can say that some of these DO get used in the US, as well: burnt, dwelt, spelt all sound familiar.

  10. #1260


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    Here's something I noticed on A Certain Other Travel Messageboard:

    a US person using "sketchy" to mean something like risky/unattractive (of a neighbourhood).

    Is this a personal misunderstanding on their part or a regular usage? To me, "sketchy" just means outline/fragmentary information (as in, a TV news reporter might say, "Details are sketchy at the moment, but it's believed that....."), but obviously this person had something negative in mind.
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  11. #1261
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    I think it's commonly used in this sense.

  12. #1262


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    URBAN dictionaries are hard to keep up with, aren't they! A whole bunch of new meanings to me there. I am far too RURAL.

  13. #1263


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    In the States "Sketchy" gets used in the broader sense primarily by the younger generation (my kids use it all the time - they're in their 30's). Oldies, like me don't adapt and adopt quite so quickly I gess.

    Felicity, I know what you mean. I'm a country bumpkin from northern Vermont (much like Lancashire BTW). Many of the usage changes, additions, expansions seem to come from city folks, where the more dynamic environment leads to new descriptions, definitions, etc..

  14. #1264
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    My younger (18) daughter uses it in the US sense all the time - I questioned her the first time I heard her say it as that usage! She seems to use it in the way I might use 'dodgy'.

  15. #1265


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    Panda, good call: "dodgy" is exacly the equivalent of the broader use of "sketchy" in the States.

  16. #1266
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    Here's something we drove by last week in the UK, and I'll include what I presume to be the US equivalent.

    UK: Anaerobic digestive facility
    US: Sewage treatment plant

  17. #1267
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    Ah, I bet that's the one this side of Oxford on the A40! And no, it's not actually sewage: it's a sort of composting of food and agricultural waste. More info here.

    Jonathan

  18. #1268
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    Yes, I think that was the one, Jonathan. And thanks for the link - renewable energy is much different than sewage treatment!

  19. #1269


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    As sewage treatment is normally aerobic I had to check this out.
    Thanks for the link, Johnathan.
    Wikipedia gives a good diagram.

    John
    "There are two types of problems: those that solve themselves, and those which you can do nothing about"
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  20. #1270


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    Getting my (now ex) Water Industry hat on!

    A sewage treatment plant (STW) can be a classed as a anaerobic digestion facility (ADF).
    Some STWs have been modified to incorporate the, (how can I put this?), newer ideas of treating waste, which flows from sewers.
    The anaerobic digestion part of the treatment of sewage is a source of renewable energy. In older STWs this waste matter is not used. There are additional benefits in that odour emissions are kept to a minimum. But it is an easy process.

    If you go to the WIKI page of the illustration John has linked it has also got a great deal of information about all kinds of sewage treatment methods.

    For me it is a bit of “spin” as the plant is still basically a STW.

  21. #1271
    Originally posted by JohnFromAus:
    That's something new I've learnt .
    learnt or learned

  22. #1272


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    Originally posted by Viache:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JohnFromAus:
    That's something new I've learnt .
    learnt or learned </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    I've learned "correct" grammar, but this is where I have to concentrate if the Lingua Franca is not to tempt me into the vulgar(archaic sense) or vernacular.

    And you can see that I am fond of tautologies.
    John
    "There are two types of problems: those that solve themselves, and those which you can do nothing about"
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  23. #1273
    @John My apologies if I have offended you in any way.

  24. #1274


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    One I can't find mention of here and I am frequently having to explain in the rental business, lest there be misunderstanding:

    US: First floor
    UK: Ground floor

    Also, I believe storey is sometimes spelt story in US English?

  25. #1275
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    Also, I believe storey is sometimes spelt story in US English?
    Felicity - In my experience, story is always spelled without the e in the US. Is it always spelled storey in the UK, or is there a difference in spelling between the "story" in a building (i.e., two story building) or a storybook story?

    Judy

  26. #1276
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    Storey for level of a building: I just found one dictionary calling it British, another Chiefly British. A few years back, American Libraries magazine's architectural review issue used the spelling storey, I think in a play on words.

  27. #1277
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    They are completely different here and consistent: Storey, always, for the level of a building and story for 'Once upon a time.....'

  28. #1278
    My wife (a recently retired technical writer/editor) and I are enjoying this subject much more than we should. Judy can not watch the local news announcers without becoming irate at the misuse of words/terminology or "made-up" words..
    Felicity: The photos of your Sansome House Cottage are enough to make me want to visit England. So different from my home here in the desert. (100 miles from Santa Fe and 1/2 mile from the Rio Grande.)

  29. #1279


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    Here's an interesting usage:

    US: visit (with)
    UK: chat with (Aus: "chat to")/ see

    We don't "visit with", we "visit" (meaning we travel), whether it's just to look at an exhibition, or to see someone, find out how they are, exchange views and so on.

    I was reminded of this distinction by this remark on a Certain Other Travel Messageboard:

    Up early this morning at 3am and takes til 4am before I realize my sister is awake too. After visiting for a few hours we fall back asleep.

    In the UK, we'd be looking puzzled and asking "What on earth was open for you to visit at that time of night?"

    And as for "seeing" people: I don't know about US usages, but in the UK it could mean anything from a neighbourly chat, to consulting a doctor, to a couple of steps beyond "going out" with someone (which is itself several steps beyond "visiting" somewhere with someone).
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  30. #1280
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    Just noticed this one crop up in a UK topic

    US: horseback riding
    UK: horse riding

    (Bit of an unintended pun there re the crop )

  31. #1281


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    And at one time, the ultra-toff would have said only "riding" (because, of course, what else would you ride but a horse)...
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  32. #1282

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    UK: Trainers
    US: Sneakers

  33. #1283


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    Somebody recently said to me in an email "I'm such a ditz". I think she may have spelt ditz with a capital D.

    Now does this mean where we would say, in the UK, "I'm such a blonde", meaning permanently lacking in brain power (sorry, blondes...), but more likely to be saying "She is such a blonde!", or does it mean something very slightly different, as in "I'm such a clot"? This could mean you have simply forgotten or misinterpreted or otherwise, but not necessarily lacking in the intellectual department. Even clever people can be "clots" at times!

  34. #1284
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    Felicity -- I think in US parlance, it is similar to using the word "airhead" - closest definition to how I understand the word comes from dictionary.com, - a giddy, absent minded person.

    Judy

  35. #1285


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    I think it could be both.

    Some people are full time air heads. Some people are having a bad day.

    Context. Full time air heads don't know they're airheads. Anybody putting themself down isn't likely to be that lacking.

  36. #1286


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    Context. Full time air heads don't know they're airheads.
    I love that little summary!

  37. #1287


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    May/June 2013 we were in BC, WA and OR and came across "ŕ la mode" on menus.

    I am used to it meaning 'in fashion' but on the trip I found it is commonly used in America to mean 'with ice cream'.

    I don't think this has appeared before on this thread.
    John
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