Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    181
    So I was in Siena, and my friend ordered this dish that was (we think!) some kind of green (radicchio?) with cheese (pecorino?) sorta baked on top. It was soo good - we were dying. And kicking ourselves that we didn't write down the ingrediants on the spot.

    It sort of looked like a baked dish - but didn't have too many ingrediants. Any ideas on a way to re-create? We're going to try a few things, but thought I'd see if others had some good ideas for a 'inspired by' dish.

  2. #2

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    181
    So I was in Siena, and my friend ordered this dish that was (we think!) some kind of green (radicchio?) with cheese (pecorino?) sorta baked on top. It was soo good - we were dying. And kicking ourselves that we didn't write down the ingrediants on the spot.

    It sort of looked like a baked dish - but didn't have too many ingrediants. Any ideas on a way to re-create? We're going to try a few things, but thought I'd see if others had some good ideas for a 'inspired by' dish.

  3. #3
    oh yum.

    Maybe the green was rucola (arugula in the states)? Was it a bit bitter? Radicchio would normally be reddish lavender.. one idea would be to lightly wilt the greens in a bit of olive oil and sliced garlic. Once wilted, put it in a small baking dish, pile on some Reggiano and melt it under the grill. Add just a touch of corse salt (being careful since the cheese also has salt) and pepper. oh yum i might have to go make this right now.

    This is just what your thread inspired me to think of... that's Italian cooking at its best!!

    di

  4. #4
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Siena, Italy
    Posts
    4,372
    KJ, what restaurant? I can call and find out if need be.

  5. #5

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    181
    Oh my goodness, Cristina, thanks! But I have no idea I went to Italy in May and I'm not one to write resturant names down. I plan to the letter when it comes to housing and museums, but I let it all hang out when it comes to food. I go wherever looks good at the moment. The result is that I never pay attention to names. Which is bad But thanks!

    paradiso - thanks for the ideas! That sounds good too. I'm excited to try something next weekend when I visit my friend in Florida...we both tasted the dish, so we'll come up with something

  6. #6
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Siena, Italy
    Posts
    4,372
    If you happen to know where it was I can figure it out.

    That being said, during May they probably served either swiss chard or wild dandelion greens if I am not mistaken (I'll call my MIL who knows the dates on all of these things)

  7. #7
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Murfreesboro TN
    Posts
    3,102
    Cristina,

    I hope you can get some good info on this. It sounds absolutely delish!

    I will keep checking this thread.

    Earline

  8. #8

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    181
    Ok an update

    I used the suggestions here and we tried to recreate. It was ok. We used a combo of spinach and arugula since we didn't have enough arugula. We saute'd w/ garlic and olive oil, then put in a small baking dish with pecorino shaved on top.

    The pecorino didn't melt as much as it got crispy - I can't help but thing that even tho my friend remembers pecorino, it must have been a more melty cheese and perhaps pecorino as an accent.

    It was decent tho, on bread.

    Next time - a stronger green to give more flavor. And a combo of cheeses to make it more "Melty" - more like a gratin maybe.

    My friend seems to rememeber that we may have eaten it at il sasso in Siena. But we're not 100% sure!

    Thanks for suggestions so far

  9. #9
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Siena, Italy
    Posts
    4,372
    What kind of percorino did you use? If you used Pecorino ROmano which is more available in the US, that would be too dry and would crist up instead of melt. If you can find un aged or a young regular Pecorino you should be fine. Pecorino Romano is not the pecorino we use here in Tuscany.

    As for the greens, I would still go with swiss chard, cicory or dandelion greens.

    I'll find out if Il Sasso was the restaurant.

  10. #10
    Try a younger pecorino Sardo. The pecorini from Sardegnia are extaordinary.

    .. or maybe a young Gruyer or Comte, which have a little better melted consistency. Swiss or French, but still yummy (spoken by a true Italy diehard)

    Worth a try...

    Given it was spring, it could have involved alot of different "erbe" like spinaci selvatica, dandilion, etc. I read the bit about swiss chard and it could also be used easily as swiss chard has more body than spinach. Endless combinations, I am going to have a glass of wine and contemplate.

    di

  11. #11
    Premium Member

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Newton (outside Boston), MA
    Posts
    11,849
    Or perhaps a fontina, which melts nicely.
    Amy in MA
    Destination Anywhere

    "A traveler without knowledge is a bird without wings."--Sa'di, Gulistan (1258)

  12. #12
    fontina would be perfect.

  13. #13

    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    181
    ummm fontina. good idea! Shall try this next time...w/ a more bitter green.

  14. #14
    I had what I think was a version of this salad at Osteria de Benci last Decemberin Florence. I was hunting around various web sites trying to find a recipe and discovered this exchange. The version I had in Florence was definitely arugula with a melty cheese on top. but I didn't get the name of the cheese. I should try fontana I guess? The menu at I Coppi in New York lists a salad with arugula and "young pecorino cheese." Could this also be it. It was WONDERFUL.

  15. #15


    Slow Traveler

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia, formerly Naples, Italy
    Posts
    670
    In our area, they do something similar with friarelli (or broccoli di rape), and scamorza, a smoked cheese. Very good if you like the smoky flavour.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •